Number one for English language teachers

Live from London: How well do you know each other?

Level: Pre-intermediate, Intermediate, Upper intermediate, Advanced Type: General lesson plan, Video Video material

Set in Brixton, London, this video lesson includes authentic interviews with people living in London talking to their friends about how well they know each other.

Note: If your device isn’t Flash compatible, then click on the link under ‘Related files’ at the bottom of the page to download the video. You can then play it through the media player on your device (e.g. iTunes).

Seven ideas on how to use this video with your class

If you’re teaching teens, you can use these videos alongside the series Impressions. This video can be used with the lesson plan ‘How well do you know each other?

Some of the ideas can be used for flipped lessons. In this scenario students can do tasks and preparatory work at home or in the school independently from the teacher for the following lesson. This allows more time for communicative tasks, teacher-led tasks or group-led tasks during class time.

1. Still image predictions

lydia and kayleigh

Level: Intermediate (B1) to upper intermediate (B2)

Summary: Students look at still images of friends to make predictions

Objective: to practise speaking; to practise making predictions

Instructions: Print out or show your students the images of the three pairs of friends. Put your students into small groups and ask them to consider the following questions to base their predictions on:

  1. How do you think they know each other?
  2. Do you think they know each other well?
  3. Who do you think will know each other the most?
  4. Who do you think will know each other the least?

Discuss the questions as a whole class before playing the video to see how accurate the predictions were.

2. Moving image predictions

Level: Pre-intermediate (A2) to upper intermediate (B2)

Summary: Students watch the video of the friends and make predictions

Objective: to practise speaking; to practise making predictions

Instructions: Place your students into small groups and play the video with no sound. As they watch, ask them to make predictions about the relationship of the interviewees and how well they might know each other. Once the video has been played ask your students to discuss the notes they’ve made before playing the video again; but this time, play it with sound so they can check their predictions.

3. True or false questions

harry and ivan

Level: Pre-intermediate (A2) to intermediate (B1)

Summary: Students are given a list of true or false statements about the video.

Objective: to listen for specific information

Flipped: Students can prepare their true and false statements outside of class – see additional ideas.  

Instructions: Look at the statements below, some are true and others are false.

  1. Kayleigh and Lydia met at school [F] They met at uni (university)
  2. They’ve known each other nine years [T]
  3. Kayleigh likes Motown music [T]
  4. Kayleigh and Lydia would go to Cuba together [T]
  5. Harry and Ivan are work colleagues [T]
  6. Harry likes heavy metal music [F] He likes classic rock
  7. Sahad likes rap music [T]
  8. Shaun’s favourite food is pizza [F] His favourite food is chicken
  9. Sahad would choose Italy as his favourite place to visit [F] He would choose Cuba
  10. Sahad likes Italy because he likes mafia films [F] He likes Cuba because he likes the film ‘Scarface’

You can either write them up on the board or create your own handout. You may wish to change the order of the statements to make it more challenging or even using the transcript you may wish to make your own true/false statements.

Additional idea: ask your students to write their own true and false statements about a close friend or family member.

4. Themed discussion

Level: Pre-intermediate (A2) to intermediate (B1)

Summary: Students use the main questions from the video and additional questions as a basis for a personalised discussion about how well they know their friends.

Objectives: to provide the opportunity for an open discussion; to practise spoken fluency.

Flipped:  Your students could do the preparatory work independently and prepare answers to bring to class the following day.

Instructions: Place your students into pairs or small groups for this activity. Before playing the video tell your students that Luke, the presenter/interviewer in the video, asks people about how well they know each other. Ask your students to note down all the questions they hear in the video. Explain that there are four questions (see list below). Note that the questions are often asked in slightly different ways.

  1. What’s your friend’s favourite music?
  2. What do you think your friend’s favourite music is?
  3. What’s his or her favourite colour?
  4. If you could choose to go to three different countries, being Cuba, Australia or Italy, where would your friend go?

Place your students in groups of three and ask one student to do the interviews with the other two students separately. Once completed, ask the interviewer to feedback to the rest of the class about how well their group know each other. As the teacher you could ask the whole class to make predictions about who will know each other the most/least.

5. How well do you know each other survey

shaun

Level: Pre-intermediate (A2) to upper intermediate (B2)

Summary: Outside of the class students go and talk to fellow students in their school or meet people in the real world or surrounding area to see how well people know each other.

Objective: to engage students; to practise note-taking; to encourage speaking

Flipped: Preparation for the lesson can be done to bring to class the following day.

Instructions: Play the video to your students as a warmer without instruction. After your students have watched the video explain that they now have a task to do outside of the classroom. Explain that they must go and meet at least three pairs of friends, colleagues or family members. In order to do this, allow the students to work in pairs and come up with some of their own questions. The following lesson, in class, change pairs and ask them to discuss who they met and what they learnt about how well they knew each other.

6. Cut up video

Level: Pre-intermediate (A2) to upper intermediate (B2)

Summary: Students are divided into three groups to watch each pair of interviewees.

Objective: to practise reported speech; to practise note-taking skills

Instructions: Divide your students into groups of three and ask each group to choose student A, B & C.

  1. Ask all A’s to stay in the class to watch the section of the video with Lydia and Kayleigh. Whilst they watch they have to make notes about the pair, how well they know each other, what they say, look like, how they act etc. Ask groups B & C to wait outside the classroom.
  2. Repeat the above with B students watching Harry and Ivan.
  3. Repeat the above with C students watching Sahad and Shaun

When all the students have watched their own section place them back into their original group of three to discuss what they learn.

Finally, play the whole video one more time to consolidate their notes and shared findings.

7. Abbreviations

live from london sahad

Level: Pre-intermediate (A2) to upper intermediate (B2)

Summary: Students watch the video, listening out for any spoken abbreviations.

Objective: to focus on abbreviations; to practise listening for specific information

Instructions: Firstly explain to your students what an abbreviation is (a shortform of a word or phrase)

e.g. MIA is an abbreviation for missing in action (taken from Macmillandictionary.com)

Tell your students to listen out for any abbreviations they hear in the first section ‘Lydia and Kayleigh’.

  • Two common abbreviations are used by the friends: uni- (short for university) and cos- (short for because).

Now teach the following further examples:

  • ta = thanks
  • yep / yeah = yes
  • footy = football
  • cuppa = cup of tea
  • bruv = brother
  • mare = nightmare
  • comfy = comfortable
  • gonna = going to
  • laters = see you later

Start by writing the abbreviation and asking your students to work in pairs or small groups to work out the standard form. Once their lists are completed share the answers.

Finally, ask your students to turn their papers upside down or switch off their screens and feed them the standard form and ask them to change it into the abbreviated form.

Additional idea: in small groups ask your students to write short dialogues including at least six of the above abbreviations. Ask for volunteers to read their dialogues out loud or perform them to the whole class!

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Readers' comments (3)

  • I do agree with Jean in Germany in that I find the age range in the videos very narrow. They're great videos/lessons but could be improved by including the other age groups

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Hi Jean,

    Thanks for the lovely feedback. Glad to hear you like these videos. Your comments have been passed on to our commissioning team and when we make the next batch of videos we will endeavor to find some more senior interviewees.

    Best wishes,
    The onestopenglish team

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  • I love these videos. They are extremely well made and just the right length. Well done!

    In future, do you think you could include interviews with older people? I have a lot of over 60s in my adult education classes and I know they'd be interested in hearing from their own peer group.

    Thanks in advance.

    Jean in Germany

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