Number one for English language teachers

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  • Pronunciation skills: syllables

    Author: Jonathan Marks Level: Pre-intermediate, Intermediate, Upper intermediate Type: General lesson plan Print material

    Focus on pronouncing syllables in words.

  • Pronunciation skills: glossary - homophones

    Author: Jonathan Marks Level: Pre-intermediate, Intermediate, Upper intermediate Type: Reference material Print material

  • Pronunciation skills: glossary - rhotic

    Author: Jonathan Marks Level: Pre-intermediate, Intermediate, Upper intermediate Type: Reference material Print material

  • Pronunciation skills: glossary - rhythm

    Author: Jonathan Marks Level: Pre-intermediate, Intermediate, Upper intermediate Type: Reference material Print material

  • Pronunciation skills: How many syllables?: Lesson plan

    Author: Jonathan Marks Level: Intermediate Type: General lesson plan Staff RoomPrint material

    This lesson by Jonathan Marks focuses on plural nouns and 3rd person singular verbs which are spelt with the ending -es. It helps students to develop an awareness of when this ending represents an additional syllable (e.g. age / ages) and when it doesn't (e.g. behave / behaves).

  • Pronunciation skills: Sound and spelling: Lesson plan

    Author: Jonathan Marks Level: Pre-intermediate, Intermediate, Upper intermediate, Advanced Type: General lesson plan Staff RoomPrint material

    The relationship between spelling and pronunciation in English can be confusing for a number of reasons. This lesson plan by Jonathan Marks focuses on homographs and homophones, as well as other pairs of words whose pronunciation learners tend to find confusing.

  • Pronunciation skills: Adverbs of frequency: Lesson plan

    Author: Jonathan Marks Level: Intermediate Type: General lesson plan Staff RoomPrint material

    Adverbs of frequency such as always and sometimes are a familiar teaching point. But there are plenty of other commonly-used adverbial phrases expressing frequency, and these tend to have fixed stress patterns. This lesson by Jonathan Marks practises some of these phrases with a particular focus on their stress patterns.

  • Pronunciation skills: Stress in compound nouns: Lesson plan

    Author: Jonathan Marks Level: Intermediate Type: General lesson plan Staff RoomPrint material

    This lesson by Jonathan Marks focuses on a typical stress pattern in compound nouns. Students form compounds to fit definitions and then practise the compounds by asking questions.

  • Pronunciation skills: Syllabic l: Lesson plan

    Author: Jonathan Marks Level: Intermediate, Upper intermediate, Advanced Type: General lesson plan Staff RoomPrint material

    This lesson practises the pronunciation of syllabic l. Normally, a syllable contains a vowel, but sometimes l can form a syllable without any vowel sound, as in people, with the second syllable consisting simply of the sounds /p/ + /l/, with no vowel between them. Syllabic l occurs in a lot of words with the spelling ‘consonant + le’. It also occcurs when the contraction ‘ll occurs after a consonant sound, as in that’ll do.

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