Number one for English language teachers

20th February 2020: Why do we gender AI?

Voice tech firms move to be more inclusive, with gender-neutral voice assistants and accent recognition among projects in the pipeline.

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  • No resource available, not impressed.

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  • No resource available, not impressed.

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  • Hi Paulie,

    Thank you for your comment. We are sorry you are having difficulty accessing these resources. We have checked the resource on both Chrome and Firefox and it is working. However, the site is a little slow at the moment and possibly you are experiencing time out problems. If this happens, please refresh the page and it should work fine.
    We saw that you are a new subscriber. Sometimes, when people have recently subscribed, they may have a cache issue. You could try clearing your cache (pressing 'Ctrl + Shift + Delete' on a PC or 'Cmd + Shift + Delete' on a Mac should bring up the option to do this on your computer). If problems still arise, please do contact our customer services team at help@macmillaneducation.com, who will be happy to assist you further.

    Thanks,

    onestopenglish team

  • 'More clever' versus 'cleverer'. I don't agree with the web editor, I'm afraid. Cleverer is better usage.

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  • Answers to two points:
    1) Personally, I would teach 'the sofa is softer and more comfortable'. It sounds more elegant.
    2) 'Worrier' and 'worriest' can't be the comparative and suparlative of 'worried'. They would assume an adjective 'worry', which does not exist other than as a verb or a noun. Thus we have 'more/most worried'. By the way, 'most worried' could be used in different senses: a) We are all very worried about the coronavirus epidemic, but John is the most worried of us because he's been to the Far East. b) The head master was most worried about the ratings of his school. a) is an example of a pure superlative, whereas in b) 'most' is a reinforcing adverb qualifying 'worried' and means 'extremely'.

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  • Excellent point Tania. 1) The structure being taught was "less" but your sentence is definitely elegant. 2) Worried is definitely the adjective.

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